Guitar Technique Tip of the Month

Your Personal Guitar Lesson

Douglas Niedt





RASGUEADOS Part 3 (the conclusion) covers The Rasgueado Redondo, which is the continous or rolled rasgueado. I demonstrate the way classical guitarists execute it and also the flamenco version. Finally I give you a glossary of many different rasgueado patterns used in flamenco. These can be used by the classical player for exercise to improve right-hand finger speed, relaxation, endurance, and independence.

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Download Rasgueado Technique Part 3 With Embedded Videos.pdf

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Download Rasgueado Technique Part 3, No Videos (links only).pdf

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RASGUEADOS, Part 3

By Douglas Niedt

Copyright Douglas Niedt. All Rights Reserved. This article may be reprinted, but please be considerate and give credit to Douglas Niedt.



The Rasgueado Redondo or Continuous Roll

For Classical Guitarists using the blended rasgueado technique:

For classical guitarists, the continuous rasgueado is usually done with the blended rasgueado technique using “cami” or “ami”. This first version consists of an equal number of down strokes and up strokes.



The continuous rasgueado or rolled rasgueado for classical guitarists


The blended technique is much easier to do than the separated technique used by flamenco guitarists described below. The blended continuous rasgueado can be done with or without wrist/arm rotation. Some teachers describe it as having a “circular” attack. The thumb can hover above the bass strings or rest on the guitar.

I like to use this technique in Joaquín Turina’s Ráfaga.



The continuous rasgueado or rolled rasgueado for classical guitarists used in Turina's Rafaga


To understand the details of the execution of the blended continuous roll and how to practice the pattern, watch Video #1.

Be sure to watch the video on full screen. Click the symbol to the right of "HD" in the lower right-hand corner after the video begins playing. Hit escape "ESC" on your keyboard to return to normal viewing.




A blended continuous rasgueado can also be produced by using an up stroke with the thumb followed by all down strokes with the fingers.



The continuous rasgueado or rolled rasgueado for classical guitarists, additional patterns


Watch me demonstrate how to play these rasgueados in Video #2.

Be sure to watch the video on full screen. Click the symbol to the right of "HD" in the lower right-hand corner after the video begins playing. Hit escape "ESC" on your keyboard to return to normal viewing.




The flamenco style using the separated rasgueado technique:

If we combine two or more repetitions of the 5- hit or 4-hit separated rasgueado, we have a Rasgueado Redondo or continuous roll. One of the difficulties of this technique is not to have a gap between the repetitions. The key is that on the “i” downstroke the other fingers should begin a pronounced re-curling movement into the hand. Then, as “i” completes its upstroke, all four fingers (if you are doing the 4-hit version, only “ami”) should be locked behind the thumb (or tucked into the palm) ready to begin another repetition of the pattern.



The continuous rasgueado or rolled rasgueado for classical guitarists, the flamenco style


Let me show you how to learn the flamenco-style separated continuous rasgueado patterns in Video #3.

Be sure to watch the video on full screen. Click the symbol to the right of "HD" in the lower right-hand corner after the video begins playing. Hit escape "ESC" on your keyboard to return to normal viewing.




Refinement exercise for the 5-hit continuous rasgueado

To improve the evenness of the volume of the attacks and develop finger independence, practice the pattern with rotating accents. Accent in groups of 4. This can be practiced with or without a metronome. This makes each finger a “leader” of accenting beat one of each group of four.



The continuous rasgueado or rolled rasgueado for classical guitarists, refinement exercise for the the flamenco style


Watch me demonstrate this exercise in Video #4.

Be sure to watch the video on full screen. Click the symbol to the right of "HD" in the lower right-hand corner after the video begins playing. Hit escape "ESC" on your keyboard to return to normal viewing.




More Rasgueados

Below are many patterns used by flamenco players. But there are even more! Few of these would ever be used in the classical repertoire, but they are still interesting and fun to learn.



flamenco and classical guitar rasgueados

flamenco and classical guitar rasgueados, modern style lighter rasgueados

flamenco and classical guitar rasgueados, fan rasgueados or rageo abanico

flamenco and classical guitar rasgueados


Final Thoughts

One of the main purposes of learning and practicing the separated (flicked) rasgueado techniques is to improve your ability to play a good blended rasgueado. Remember, it is the blended rasgueado that you will use almost 100% of the time in classical guitar repertoire. Learning the separated flicked technique will improve your finger independence to play a good blended rasgueado.

To learn any rasgueado pattern, it is important to practice it slowly, developing the individual finger movements and finger independence. Program every single motion into the hand. Take your time. Don’t over practice. At first, it is best to practice rasgueados 5-10 minutes every day. If you practice 30 minutes, there is a good chance you will hurt yourself and then you will have to stop practicing for several days for the hand to recover. Practicing consistently a little bit every day will help you learn a rasgueado more quickly.

Here are a few pieces in which rasgueado techniques may be incorporated:

Fandanguillo, Ráfaga, and Soleares (Joaquín Turina)
Leyenda and Sevilla (Isaac Albéniz)
The Millers Dance (Manuel de Falla)
Popular and classical versions of Malagueña


pdf icon

PDFs and Video Downloads

We provide this Technique Tip in several formats to make it easier to read on your devices.

1. This PDF with embedded videos will not play well unless you download and save it to your device first. It may not work properly on all devices. It is a large file (1.4 GB).

Download Rasgueado Technique Part 3 With Embedded Videos.pdf

2. You may also download a PDF version without embedded videos (links to videos only) and then download or watch the videos separately.
Download Rasgueado Technique Part 3, No Videos (links only).pdf

3. Want to watch/download the videos separately?
You will find them here.

Note: You must have Adobe Reader 10 or later installed on your computer to play the videos contained in the PDFs. Download Adobe Reader here.